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Tag Archives: The Wall Street Journal

Moshi for iPad
  • The growing popularity of mobile media through PC Tablets, Android Smartphones and even Apple's iPhones is allowing new methodology and movements is changing on how consumers are engaging and interacting with the media. Gone are the days of the Sunday morning newspaper being read at the breakfast table with a steaming cup of coffee in one hand and the business section in the other, gone are the days of the family gathering around the television to watch the five o'clock news while mom prepares dinner in the nearby kitchen. Today the media is mobile and so are the individuals accessing that media on a weekly, daily or even hourly basis. Media consumers can simply stay connected by clicking on MSNBC.com or CNN.com while we sit in a drive thru waiting for our morning Starbucks coffee; we're literally connected with the media at our very fingertips. With the our fingertip connection many publishers, media companies and application developers are eager to know whether they should optimize their content for particular devices, advertisers want to understand how these devices might eventually fit into their overall marketing plans and even online newspaper carriers such as the USA Today or even the Wall Street Journal want to evolve their business models in a multi-connection world. No one in the mobile media universe wants to be left behind in this ever changing digital expansion.


    Smartphones and Connecting with the Consumer


    Overnight we have literally become a world “addicted to their Smartphones, iPhones and PC Tablets.” Whereas most common usage of those particular devices tends to include socializing, downloading music, gaming, and surfing the event, researchers have slowly and steadily began to see changes even in the ways consumers shop for their groceries. According to IGD Research Corporation, 1 in 10 online shoppers are using Smartphones to shop usually comparing prices, bargains and brands and more than 15% of customer checkouts during the first half of the year came via their Smartphone applications. More than 66% of surveyors indicated claimed that more than 75% of Smartphone users such as HTC One S, BlackBerry Bold 9900, etc used their Smartphones for personal reasons and 69% of users used it for business purposes. In the United States consumers prefer to mobile browsers for banking, travel, shopping, local info, news, video, sports and blogs and prefer applications for games, social media, maps and music.


    Smartphone usage is now a part of our daily lives whether at home or on the go and businesses without a Smartphone presence may find themselves competitively disadvantaged. Some mobile media and businesses changes to watch and take note of include 74.1% of mobile subscribers used text messaging on their mobile device, while 50.2% used downloaded applications. Smartphone and other mobile users cannot necessarily be defined by age, gender, income or race; instead they can be defined by their members' shared behaviors. It's up to businesses and mobile media to understand the common behavior traits that unite the class makes members easy to recognize and underscores the influence and utilize how their consumers are communicating, consuming media and deciphering consumer shopping and spending habits. Because the mobile media trend including Smartphones, iPhones and Tablets isn't going anywhere anytime soon but those that don't adapt will collapse as the mobile world around them continually presses forward.


    Smartphones and Connecting with the Consumer




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


     HTC CEO refuses to produce cheap cell phones As a means to energize sales


    HTC refuses to offer cheaper handsets just to boost sales.  Despite struggling to match the sales numbers of its competitors, the company is sticking to its strategy of producing only medium- to high-end handsets.


    HTC CEO Peter Chou defended the company’s strategy in an interview with The Wall Street Journal. “We don’t want to destroy our brand image. We insist on using better materials to make better products that offer premium experience. Many consumers like that.”


    Chou’s comments come at a time when many industry watchers are beginning to question HTC’s strategy. Motorola and Samsung are capturing the low-end handset market in the Chinese market, but Chao insists that HTC will not manufacture “cheap, cheap phones” to boost its market share.


    HTC will increase its marketing efforts and expand its distribution network into emerging markets. Chou expects that 2012 Chinese shipments will reach three times last year’s total. Shipments to India and other emerging markets are steadily growing. Chou is adamant, “We think our strategy is successful.”




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