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Tag Archives: Google

Moshi for iPad
  • By Aldo Panessidi 


    Google attempts to block US shipments of Apple iPhone and iPad


    Bloomberg reported that Google may have grounds to ask the International Trade Commission to block U.S. imports of the Apple iPhone and iPad  over 3G patents held by Motorola Mobility. This speculation is based upon Google’s accusations that Apple has violated 3G patents held by Motorola Mobility, one of Google’s latest acquisitions.


    Here’s the quote from the Bloomberg report, “The U.S. International Trade Commission said it will review ITC Judge Thomas Pender’s findings that Apple was violating one Motorola Mobility patent. The commission is scheduled to issue a final decision on Aug. 24, and has the power to block devices made in Asia from entering the U.S.”


    Google bought Motorola Mobility in part to gain access to Motorola’s stockpile of 17,000 patents, many on phone technology. Apple had already filed a complaint against Motorola Mobility at the European Union, accusing them of misusing patents that relate to industry standards.  When Google bought Motorola, that battle with Apple came as part of the deal.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    MightyText is a brand new app that lets Android users view and send SMS or MMS messages through their computer when they can’t or don’t want to use their Android smartphone. MightyText syncs to your smartphone, copies your texts, and stores them in the cloud.


    MightyText takes texting back to the computer


    Originally, MightyText went through a beta test as a Chrome extension. Now it’s available as a web application.


    To set up your smartphone, connect to any browser. Open the Google Play store. Download the free MightyText app to your phone.  Then go to the MightyText website (www.mightytext.net). Log in, and set up your account. Sync to your Google Contacts and have your contacts’ information added to the MightyText web app.  You’re all set to send a receive texts without your phone in hand.


    I’m sure you can come up with a few scenarios where the MightyText option would come in handy. Maybe your phone is dead and you need to check your texts. Maybe you’re at the office with your laptop in front of you, and you can’t pull out your smartphone. Pull up the MightyText website and send and receive texts on your computer.


    Give it a try at Google Play. What the heck, it’s free.




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  • By Adhurim Murtezai


    Here comes Google’s new Nexus tablet


    Google is finally ready to show what it can do with its own brand of tablet. It’s called the “Nexus 7. ” We hear we’ll get a first look at it at next week’s Google I/O developer conference.


    DigiTimes just reported a number of details about the Nexus 7 slate that seem to ring true. The DigiTimes source in the tablet’s supply chain claimed that Google’s next major Android release - Jelly Bean - would come in the second quarter. They also reported that Nexus tablet shipments would begin in June in preparation for a July launch.


    Microsoft’s unveiling of its “Surface” tablet seems to be the start of a major effort by software wizards to become hardware masters. Google seems to be right behind. Google also has a few Android partners that help on the device building side. Some are developing their own software expertise. Just when we thought the only entertainment was going to be Apple against the rest of the world, it seems the natives have gotten restless.


    Google I/O begins on June 27th.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi 


    Google regularly updates its transparency report that details thousands of requests from governments around the world to censor search results, drop YouTube videos or review user data.   A sample snapshot of this report is shown below.


    Google refuses to comply with government censorship  of a Canadian destroying his passport


    Google doesn’t just bend to government’s will either. While Google did agree to cooperate on blogs promoting hate speech and violence, it refused to censor a video where a Canadian citizen creatively destroyed his passport.


    Google did however, comply and remove a tweaked iPhone 4S parts video after Apple threatened legal action.


    Google logs and details every request. Their numbers indicate that the only comply with about half of the requests, indicating Google’s fundamental respect for the right to free speech in a great majority of cases.


    Most filings come from the US, UK and India. The list makes for interesting reading.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    Google’s possible response to Apple’s Open Street Map


    The rumor that Open Street Map will be replacing Google Maps as Apple’s default mapping application looks inevitable.  Given the symbiotic relationship that Google and Apple have enjoyed for so long, you can’t help but speculate about what this means to the future of Google’s spirit of cooperation on the app front.


    Google has always been willing to develop Apple-friendly app versions of their products, but now Apple appears to be invading Google territory with Open Street Map.


    It looks like Google has a couple of ways to respond. They can take their apps and go home, or show Apple they ain’t seen nothing yet for iOS. Of course, as a third option, Google could keep letting Apple decide where their apps are welcome and where they are not. That just doesn’t sound like Google.


    Here is some speculation (with a heavy dose of opinion) about how Google might be able to create a little independence from Apple and give Apple users Google alternatives.


    Google Maps


    Google’s possible response to Apple’s Open Street Map


    Google might want to take this opportunity to develop its own third-party iOS-compatible map application. It would give them complete control over how their product is used and what goes into the iOS version. Google’s balancing act would be to provide a map app that Apple users want to use more than their parent’s version, and be just short of what they’d get with Android so they’d consider making the switch. Of course, Google has to walk the thin line of keeping Android users at home, too.


    The opinion around here is that Google should show up Apple. Google would have more control over their maps app on the iOS platform, and not lose advertising dollars. Google should give its Android users an app that has better navigation than anything Apple’s loyalists can expect.  Android losing users to iOS has been the trend for too long. It’s time to show Apple how good they really are at maps.


    Google Drive


    Google’s possible response to Apple’s Open Street Map


    Google Drive is a strong competitor for Apple’s iCloud and Dropbox combo, but all Google seems to have done is rename Google Docs as Google Drive.  Regardless of its name, if Apple wanted to create some competition for Google Drive, they’d have to at least marry iCloud and iWork.


    Google has an iOS version of Drive in the works. Again, the challenge is how to design the app to entice Apple users to use it, and get some of them to switch to Android because of what they can only get with Android. It would come down to Google being able build a better Drive, something we haven’t heard is on the agenda right now.


    There’s another twist to Google’s dilemma. Unlike Maps, Drive has a lot of competition. Although Drive is a nice all-in-one package, other apps have features that Drive doesn’t.  Google has to give Apple users the full-featured Drive; otherwise they already have other places to go.


    Google Music


    Google’s possible response to Apple’s Open Street Map


    There is nothing else out there like Google Music. Upload your entire music collection right from iTunes, and access it from anywhere you can get on the Web – your phone, your tablet, your computer, or someone else’s computer.  Really it’s more of a question of where you can’t access it.


    Now that we’ve established that Google’s product outshines anything Apple offers, would it be worthwhile to Google to design an iOS version?


    Consider first what being a Google Play user means. When you want to buy new music, you press the Google Play button in Google Music and go right to the Google Play Store.  While you can upload the music you purchase on iTunes to your Google Music account, Apple isn’t going to make it easy to buy anything from the Google Play Store. There’s no referral money in it for them, and they’d lose their own iTunes sales.


    If Google were to release a Google Music app for iOS, instead of buying their music in iTunes and transferring it, Apple users would buy their music from Google via the Web. Besides, while Apple charges a subscription fee for iTunes Match, it’s free to sync your music to you Google Music account.  There’s no reason to make the extra effort to buy music on iTunes, and only to transfer it to Google Music.


    There is the loss of ad money to consider if they create a Google Music client on iOS, but we’re sure Google is taking a hard look at its options on this one. 


    Google Chrome


    Google’s possible response to Apple’s Open Street Map


    There is really no competition out there for Google Chrome. It’s the best browser choice on any platform.  Other competitors have tried to topple Google, but no one has come close. When you want to do a search, you “google it”, you don’t “bing it” or “yahoo it.” Does Apple (or anyone else for that matter) have any hope of competing with Google on the browser front?


    Google has been cranking up their investment in Chrome. What Google created on the Web, they’ve duplicated for mobile with Chrome for Android.  Now, with their minimalist approach to operating system design, Google has got Microsoft looking over its shoulder with Chrome OS for devices like tablets and netbooks.


    Google defined “search engine”, and it’s doing that very successfully for other platforms.  There just doesn’t seem to be any reason for Google to share it with Apple and iOS.


    Google could consider going after Safari Mobile with a Chrome iOS that is as full-featured as the Android version. There’s an inherent problem with making this effort though. With Android you can set Chrome OS as the default browser. Everything you do with the web will be done through Chrome if you want it that way. With iOS, Safari would be the default and the user would have to make the manual switch to Chrome with each search.


    Again, Google knows its stuff when it comes to this product. Google is probably already in the game on this one.


    Final words


    We’re probably not telling Google anything they don’t already know. They have had a good thing going with Apple for awhile now, but the app game is changing very quickly. Hardware and software keep out-doing one another, so there is plenty of room for new directions. One of those might be making a bigger effort at crossing platforms with some of Google’s mainstays like Maps, Music, Drive and Chrome. They are all well-designed products, and a couple of them have no serious competition.


    Go for it Google. We like choices!




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    Google helpfully added badges to its Chrome Web Store so you could tell if an app offers offline functionality, and now Google has made the search even easier with an offline section in the Chrome Web Store.


    Look to Google’s Chrome Web Store for your Space Invaders fix


    We are hoping to see mobile apps for both cell phone and tablets from Chrome web store


    Go to the "Collections" part of the store, and find the "Offline Apps" section. Lots of the titles will be familiar -  Angry Birds, Google Calendar, Google Docs and Offline Google Mail. Those will be alongside selections like Nitro for task management, NYTimes for news and Space Invaders for those needing a nostalgia rush.


    Developers aren’t being left out of the improvements. Google announced the availability of the Chrome Web Store in Turkey, Ukraine, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Morocco and the United Arab Emirates.  All developers can use new analytics tools to view their titles’ performance trends over the past 90 days.  This one isn’t surprising. Google does know data.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    Recently released figures from Google about the relative number of devices running a given version of Android are showing an interesting increase in the number of active Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich devices. The numbers, which are based on the number of Android devices that have accessed Google Play within a two week period (ending on 1st May 2012), show that just under 5% of all Android devices now run Android 4.0, of these, the vast majority run 4.0.3 or 4.0.4 rather than 4.0, 4.0.1 or 4.0.2.


    Android version share


    Samsung has come through on its promise to release the upgrade to OS 4.0 for Samsung Galaxy S2 on May 3rd.


    See an actual Samsung Galaxy S2 On OS 4.0



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    OS 2.3 to 4.0 will be a terrific leap in usability... optimizing both the hardware and software for all you Galaxy S2 users. Watch for it on your devices today.


    Enhance your mobility and turn your device into a power tool! Discover select accessories such as; stylus & pens, microSD memory cards, batteries, docking stations, Bluetooth headsets, data cables and XMI Speakers all specifically designed to make your devices functionally efficient and performance rich.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    Is Samsung to have its tiara and sash taken away? Will Google choose another manufacturer to make the next Nexus handset and dethrone the reigning queen? And, *gasp* could it be an underdog victory for LG, the manufacturer that has had its fits and starts with Android smartphones?


    If chosen, the lagging manufacturer would get early access to the next gen version of Android which means great buzz, great press and great sales. Samsung has been a perfect example of this success model by being the vendor bringing us the two latest Nexus devices: the Nexus S and the Galaxy Nexus. With experience working with Google and new, major Android OS version upgrades, there are a fair number positives in the incumbent’s favor. So if they have ushered in a Nexus for Gingerbread and now Ice Cream Sandwich, will they also be cobranded with Jellybean?


    Top 5 Smartphone VendorsAnd how will LG Mobile win the bid when Samsung sold an impressive 300 million cell phones last year and is continually vying for top-smartphone brand ranking in the US? Honestly, the more likely competition will come from Google internally and its latest acquisition-in-the-works: Motorola Mobility. The tech conglomerate has made reassurances that it would not play favorites with Motorola, but… really? How would that make business sense?


    Operating System Share of Smartphone SalesIf Google does opt to dole out Nexus rights to an external manufacturer, the status will not be quite so dramatic as Motorola would still get the perk of early iteration to next gen Android OS. And, by all accounts the company’s engineering and software teams will likely work closely post-acquisition which put Motorola in a position to help shape the Android platform. There is the question of how will peripheral devices, accessory appeal and that brand association affect these contenders and what will they bring to the table in terms of docking stations and power options to garner more attention and press?


    What LG does have in its favor (despite notorious custom Android skins that have not won over customers) is their marked improvements from past years to this year’s MWC showing which introduced the optimistically improved LG Optimus 4X.  This shows ambition and a willingness to put in the work. A little bit of gumption, elbow grease, and a good ole fashioned Hail Mary Pass maybe do the trick for LG.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    Last December, Sony released an alpha Android 4.0 ROM... now they are regaling us with more ice cream sandwich goodness.  Sony has released the beta version of this ROM for select Sony Xperia devices


    Sony Xperia Arc S


    While this update comes with much more functionality than its predecessor, it still lacks very important features.   Some of the more prominent added features include activated GSM modem, FM radio, updated UI, beefed up lock screen and a quick dialer.  Being able to access GSM networks is probably the most important, consumer utilizing this  ROM will now be able to make calls... precisely what phone is designed to do.


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    There are important features that are lacking, though, since Sony is still waiting for approval in order to activate them. Such include WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity, as well as access to Google Apps including the Android market. Hopefully Google will give them the okay soon, and Android 4.0 will be in the wild before too long.


    This beta version is aimed at developers, as Sony does not intend this incomplete ROM to be used as a daily driver. Regardless, it could be fun for the more adventurous Android user to check out what Ice Cream Sandwich will be like on Sony hardware. If you happen to be the proud owner of an Xperia Arc S, Xperia Ray, or Xperia Neo V, this ROM is available for your flashing needs.



    This post was posted in General, Smartphones, Sony Ericsson and was tagged with Xperia, Sony, Ice Cream Sandwich, GSM modem, Google, Android

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  • Google Chrome Poised to Change Android
    Posted on February 13, 2012 by Pure Mobile

    By Aldo Panessidi


    The recent “cloud” technology is a buzz word that readers have grown to both love and hate.   What does it mean? How does it work? Well with data centers and internet: iCloud and Google are the poster children for bringing the wonders of the ‘cloud’ to millions of people with their smartphones, tablets, iPods and all the technology that brings it together.  Google’s project to connect these all to the web is called Chromium OS which targets the desktop.   Mozilla is taking another approach with Boot to Gecko (B2G) that will go after mobile devices with a standalone OS on the open web on mobile devices (a major announcement regarding this is expected to be made at MWC).


    Android Chrome Scale


    So, Google’s move to take its Chrome browser to the Android mobile platform doesn’t come as much of a surprise. While this reassures us that Android is not going anywhere as a mobile OS platform, we could soon see the end of native operating systems and the beginning of web operating systems. For, as Google’s Engineering Manager, Arnaud Weber says, “You should have your Chrome experience wherever you are.”


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    What’s the benefit in this change though? The idea is that the open web can replace proprietary, single-vendor stacks like iOS, Android, Windows and all the familiar names when it comes to app development. At the moment, there are hurdles for web developers to build apps for the open web that are equal to native apps, but that too will change and will likely extend to our mobile accessories and peripheral devices.


    The good news is that Chrome for Android is not a watered down version of Chrome. Instead, it is a full blown multi-process desktop browser (approaching our tablets and smartphones as additional endpoints). While it will include HTML5 features and Google’s V8 JavaScript for Android, it doesn’t look like AdobeFlash will be part of the roadmap. So, for streaming media that requires Flash, a media player may be a good device to keep as part of your arsenal.


    Enhance your mobility and turn your device into a power tool!  Discover select accessories such as; stylus & pens, micro SD memory cardsbatteriesdocking stationsBluetooth headsetsdata cables and glider gloves all specifically designed to make your devices functionally efficient and performance rich.


    The immediate future hints to Chrome replacing the Android Browser in the coming months and potentially there will be devices that boot to the web at the MWC. But, with the tight control of wireless carriers that fear change and services they cannot charge for (battle royale of roaming and unlocked phones anyone?), the transition of this technology to mobile devices may take a bit longer to reach consumers.



    This post was posted in Google, Smartphones and was tagged with Mobile Platform, Mobile Browser, Chrome, Android Browser, Google, Android

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