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Moshi for iPad
  • Samsung's Space Odyssey in court
    Posted on August 2, 2012 by kduggan


    Apple and Samsung are getting even pettier with their patent war, and the judge is getting fed up with it.


    Judge Lucy Koh took advantage of a day off from listening to the two in court to issue rulings that re-define the boundaries around Samsung’s arguments that they didn’t infringe on Apple’s iPad design or that Apple didn't have the rights to the design in the first place.


    Samsung appears to have crossed the line with their argument that Apple lifted it from the movie “2001: A Space Odyssey.” In a scene from the 1968 film, astronauts are eating and using personal tablet computers. Samsung argues that Apple got the idea for the iPad from that scene.


    According to Samsung, the tablet in the movie “has an overall rectangular shape with a dominant display screen, narrow borders, a predominately flat front surface, a flat back surface (which is evident because the tablets are lying flat on the table’s surface), and a thin form factor.” That describes an iPad alright.


    Samsung responded to Judge Koh’s statements with a press release that said, “Samsung was not allowed to tell the jury the full story and show the pre-iPhone design for that and other phones that were in development at Samsung in 2006, before the iPhone. The excluded evidence would have established beyond doubt that Samsung did not copy the iPhone design”.


    Apple and Samsung are back in court today. We’ll see whether they’re paying any attention to Judge Lucy, and are ready to get back to the point.




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  • Sprint’s CEO Dan Hesse has just confirmed that his company will carry Motorola’s Photon Q LTE later this year. The new 4G LTE smartphone runs Android Ice Cream Sandwich 4.0.4 on a 1.5 GHz dual-core processor. The Photon Q comes with a full slide-out QWERTY keyboard,  a 4.3-inch ColorBoost Display screen,  a rear-facing 8MP camera with 1080p video capture, and a long-lasting battery (thanks to Motorola’s Smartactions app.)


    The new Photon Q is expected to ship with NFC capability to power the new Android Beam data transfer service and Google Wallet mobile payment services.


    This Android slider phone with a full QWERTY keyboard is perfect for the business community that has long been looking for a reason to retire those worn out BlackBerrys. The Photon Q is the latest 4G with a physical keyboard smartphone, joining the ranks of the Motorola Droid 4, Samsung Captivate Glide and Samsung Epic.


    Like other Motorola phones, the Photon Q LTE will be environmentally friendly and ULE-platinum certified.


    Sprint hasn’t mentioned a release date or pricing information for the Motorola device, but the company expects to make these announcements in the coming weeks.




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  • By Adhurim Murtezai


    Nokia doesn’t need any more bad press, but now Reuters and BusinessWeek have been spreading the news from more than a few financial analysts and venture capitalists that Nokia’s troubles are far from over.


    Analysts anticipate more troubles for Nokia


    UBS stated that Nokia would have “to significantly discount its new Microsoft Lumia products, including the Nokia Lumia 900, Nokia Lumia 800 and the Nokia Lumia 710 in order… to gain any traction with retailers, operators and consumers.”


    Canaccord Genuity predicted “a continued sharp decline in Symbian smartphone sales…combined with a slow ramp in Windows smartphone volume.”


    Janardan Menon with Liberum Capital said that Nokia had,  ”too much baggage in terms of cost structure and legacy operating systems” to be attractive to most buyers.


    Charlie Wolf, an analyst at Needham & Company painted the worst picture. He said “if Nokia doesn’t come out of its funk within a year, Nokia is going to be finished.”


    Microsoft has been the only company talked about as a serious potential buyer.


    Nokia has been lowering its projections. Most recently they cut earnings expectations and announced layoffs of 10,000 employees by the end of 2013.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    What’s so special about Intel’s Orange San Diego?


    Intel’s first Android cell phone, the Orange San Diego (once known as the Santa Clara), performed quite well for a debut device from a first-time smartphone manufacturer.  Packed with a (1024 x 600) 4-inch LCD, 8-megapixel camera with flash, micro-HDMI port and 1GB of RAM, the San Diego appears to be a solid, mid-range Android device. During its pre-launch, Intel didn’t over-promise on the San Diego, but focused on a few priorities: good web browsing performance, a high-quality camera and maximum battery life.


     


    Watch the following insightful video on the Intel smartphone



    Hardware:


    The Orange San Diego’s look like a smartphone should.  The cell phone case is durable but is a pretty ordinary design. Its black body is ringed by a silver border. There’s nothing special about the finish or any of the other body parts. The soft-touch backing is a nice feature for such an inexpensive phone, but it will still need the protection of a skin or a case to keep it blemish-free.


    Along the right side of the 10mm edge are the volume rocker, micro-SIM slot and two-stage camera button. The micro-USB port is at the bottom. The mini-HMDI output is along the left side. All of the buttons are responsive. The camera button even quick launches the camera.


    The Orange San Diego resembles a Samsung Galaxy S2 or an iPhone 3GS, but the prominent bezel below the screen gets in the way of it being as user-friendly as those two devices.


    That the San Diego has a 4-inch screen is a nice surprise. While there’s no Super AMOLED Plus or Super LCD 2, the contrast is sharp and the colors are rich, although there is a little discoloration on the edges. The 1024 x 600 is screen is ample. When turned up to full brightness the screen was almost readable in full daylight.


    There’s almost 11GB of storage space, but no expansion slot. The whole phone is sealed, so the battery is not removable, so a quick reset by removing the battery is not a possibility.


    The camera can be controlled by the physical button or the touchscreen. The rear-facing camera can record 1080p video. The four capacitive buttons can be read in daylight. They also illuminate if lighting is too low.


    Camera:


    This is probably the biggest disappointment. While the camera is an 8-megapixel / 1.3-megapixel camera duo, you can’t judge this phone’s performance by its specs.  Those 8-megapixels don’t live up to their reputation with this phone. While it is capable of burst capture, images are blurry and colors are washed out. Overall, photos appear dull and images aren’t very detailed.  Color reproduction indoors was no better. Problems seem to improve a bit when operating in macro mode.


    You’ve got a lot of camera control options including capturing multiple photos at differing exposures. The camera doesn’t have an HDR mode, but you can download your images, and turn them into HDR on separate hardware. The camera does have several auto exposure modes (including aperture and shutter priority), shutter-speed adjustment, anti-banding options, RAW mode, ISO settings (800 maximum) and a burst-mode capable of 15 frames per second for up to 10 shots, but you might not have much use for them given the overall mediocre performance of the camera.


    Video produced the same ho-hum results. White balancing helped with fuzziness, but also washed-out whites.  Autofocus performed well but slowly. 


    Software:


    What’s so special about Intel’s Orange San Diego?


    The San Diego’s OS is Android Gingerbread. The phone should be Android 4.0-capable, and that will be available later this year. It's hard to tell what was customized in the Orange San Diego’s OS. There are gesture features that could be useful.  Drawing a symbol with your finger across the home screen or with any app acts as a shortcut that will take you to your pre-identified location. You can assign up to 27 shortcuts to apps, contacts, playlists and even Foursquare places.


    Popular apps like Orange Wednesday come pre-installed but so do less-useful apps like the Orange Assistant, a redundant user guide and an NFC tags app. The presence of the NFC app doesn’t make much sense. The phone is NFC-capable, but it doesn’t come with taggable cards, and it’s not connected to Orange's existing payment service.


    The display keyboard is one of the most responsive of any Android device, regardless of price. Swype is offered as an option as well. The web browser performs comparably to other dual-core Android devices. Even dense websites download easily and with little stutter.


    Most apps were compatible with the new chipset, and only two didn’t work out of many tested.


    Call quality was sharp and clear. Orange provides HD voice calling between the San Diego and other HD devices. The San Diego’s earSmart voice-cancellation processing is found in higher-end phones like the Galaxy S3. 


    Performance and Battery Life:


    These are the two most important indicators of a viable future for Intel in the smartphone market.


    The San Diego’s processor can’t come near a quad-core or Snapdragon S4s, but its single-core 1.6GHz Intel Atom Z2460 performs like a dual-core processor.


    Overall, benchmark testing was good, and performance results have been consistent since the device was originally tested at its launch. In the case of JavaScript benchmark testing against other versions of the same browser, the San Diego’s performance is nothing short of amazing. Its SunSpider score was better than the Galaxy S III’s!  There is no doubt that Intel lives up to its promise of delivering an exceptional web browser.


    Battery life didn't hold up to Intel’s promise of 14 days' in standby mode. It’s primarily due to the juice drained by powering the screen. The San Diego was tested with a video loop with the screen at 50 percent brightness. The phone ran out of power around seven hours and 20 minutes. That’s a result pretty much on par with other Android devices, but not bad for a 4-inch smartphone.


    Day-to-day use was a lot better than many other of the latest smartphones. The battery lasted two to three days between charges. Not using the smartphone features at all gave the battery a two-week lifespan between charges.


    To sum it all up:


    Overall, Intel's first Android smartphone performed admirably.


    • The real stand-out was its Medfield processor that met and, in some cases, exceeded expectations.
    • The battery didn’t live up to Intel’s claims but still held its power very well.
    • The camera was a big disappointment. Back to the drawing board Intel.
    • When compared to Samsung and HTC devices the San Diego looks cheap and somewhat fragile.
    • It needs Ice Cream Sandwich sooner rather than later.

    Priced at $308 USD, the San Diego joins a nice variety of inexpensive entry-level smartphones in the Orange family.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


     HTC CEO refuses to produce cheap cell phones As a means to energize sales


    HTC refuses to offer cheaper handsets just to boost sales.  Despite struggling to match the sales numbers of its competitors, the company is sticking to its strategy of producing only medium- to high-end handsets.


    HTC CEO Peter Chou defended the company’s strategy in an interview with The Wall Street Journal. “We don’t want to destroy our brand image. We insist on using better materials to make better products that offer premium experience. Many consumers like that.”


    Chou’s comments come at a time when many industry watchers are beginning to question HTC’s strategy. Motorola and Samsung are capturing the low-end handset market in the Chinese market, but Chao insists that HTC will not manufacture “cheap, cheap phones” to boost its market share.


    HTC will increase its marketing efforts and expand its distribution network into emerging markets. Chou expects that 2012 Chinese shipments will reach three times last year’s total. Shipments to India and other emerging markets are steadily growing. Chou is adamant, “We think our strategy is successful.”




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    According to one intrepid member of Xda-Developers, the HTC One X has several wifi related problems that will either adversely affect the device’s battery life or prevent it from connecting to wifi networks.


    What happens when you squeeze the HTC One X Between its camera lens and the volume button?


    The Xda forum member who goes by the name “Bigoliver” describes a simple procedure that he says can be used test for this wifi problem: gently squeeze the side back of your phone between the camera lens and the volume buttons. Watch for changes in the wifi signal. If you see the signal strength improve, only to drop back down when you stop squeezing, then your device has wifi connectivity problems. You should trade it in for a new one. If it’s too late for a no-cost exchange on your cell phone you’re hosed.


    An HTC representative has posted in the Xda-Developers forums that the company is aware of the issue and is asking for feedback to help the company’s engineering team pinpoint the problem.


    Thanks to Dustin Karnes at Android Guys for bringing this one to our attention.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    The business networking website LinkedIn has confirmed reports that some of its users’ passwords have been stolen and leaked on the Internet. According to Finnish security firm CERT-FI, a forum member in Russia has claimed responsibility for stealing 6.46 million encrypted LinkedIn passwords and posting them online.   In fact, with the quad processing power provided by today top brand cell phones and tablets like the:


    The theft of six million LinkedIn passwords


    Apple iPhone 4, iPhone 4s, iPad 2 and iPad 3


    Blackberry Touch 9900, Blackberry 9790, Blackberry 9360, Blackberry Torch and the Blackberry Playbook


    Samsung  S3, Samsung S2, Samsung S2 X, Samsung  S2 LTE, Samsung Note and the Samsung Tab


    HTC  Evo, HTC One X, HTC one S, HTC One V, HTC Amaze as well as the HTC Flyer and HTC Jetstream


    Motorola Razor, Motorola Defy  as well as the Motorola Xoom


    Nokia Lumia 900, Nokia Lumia 800, Nokia Lumia 710


    LG Optimus L7, LG Optimus Pro, LG Optimus 4G LTE and LG Optimus Pad


    Sony Xperia U, Sony Xperia Play, Sony Xperia Ray


    could have easily been used by the hacker to perpetrate the cybercrime.


    It is recommended that all LinkedIn users change their passwords as a precautionary measure. If you use that same passwords on other sites (as most people do), you should change it on those sites as well.


    We want to provide you with an update on this morning’s reports of stolen passwords. We can confirm that some of the passwords that were compromised correspond to LinkedIn accounts. We are continuing to investigate this situation and here is what we are pursuing as far as next steps for the compromised accounts:


    1. Members that have accounts associated with the compromised passwords will notice that their LinkedIn account password is no longer valid.
    2. These members will also receive an email from LinkedIn with instructions on how to reset their passwords. There will not be any links in this email. Once you follow this step and request password assistance, then you will receive an email from LinkedIn with a password reset link.
    3. These affected members will receive a second email from our Customer Support team providing a bit more context on this situation and why they are being asked to change their passwordsThe theft of six million LinkedIn passwords.

     


    Enhance your mobility and turn your device into a power tool!  Discover select accessories such as; stylus & pens, micro SD memory cards, batteries, docking stations, Bluetooth headsets, data cables, HTC Media Link and XMI Speakers all specifically designed to make your devices functionally efficient and performance rich.


    It is worth noting that the affected members who update their passwords and members whose passwords have not been compromised benefit from the enhanced security we just recently put in place, which includes hashing and salting of our current password databases.


    We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience this has caused our members. We take the security of our members very seriously. If you haven’t read it already it is worth checking out my earlier blog post today about updating your password and other account security best practices.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    A new report suggests that the popularity of Google’s Android OS is due to peak in 2012. The market will begin a major shift towards a strong Microsoft Windows platform.


    Microsoft Windows predicted to take a big bite out of Google’s Android starting in 2013


    The market research firm IDC just released the details of its latest Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker report. The firm predicts that, while cell phone shipments will reach 1.8 billion units this year (compared to 1.7 billion in 2011), the numbers reflect stalled growth when compared to previous years. The major cause seems to be the beginning of a rapid decline in sales for feature phones. The IDC forecasts the lowest annual growth rate in their sales since 2009.


    Protect your Android devices with the latest innovative protection solutions... stylish top brand cases and skins specifically designed to protect your devices from scratches and blemishes.  Tough on the outside, sweet on the inside these brand name protection accessories combine complete device coverage with sleek artistic expression.  Discover a wide protection collection for:


    Samsung Galaxy S 3Galaxy S 2, Galaxy S2 X, Galaxy S 2 LTE, Galaxy Tab


    HTC One SHTC One X, HTC One V, HTC EVO 3D, HTC Flyer and HTC Jetstream


    Nokia Lumia 900 and Nokia Lumia 800


    Motorola Droid RAZR, Motorola Defy, Motoluxe, Motorola Xoom


    Sony Xperia U, Sony Xperia ION, Sony Xperia Play


    LG Optimus L7, LG Optimus 4G LTE and the Optimus Pad


    IDC analyst Kevin Restivo was quoted as saying, “The smartphone parade won’t be as lively this year as it has been in past. The mobile phone user-transition from feature phones to smartphones will continue in a gradual but unabated fashion. Smartphone growth, however, will increasingly be driven by a triumvirate of smartphone operating systems, namely Android, iOS and Windows Phone 7.”


    Microsoft Windows predicted to take a big bite out of Google’s Android starting in 2013


    The smartphone market is expected to continue growing over the next five years, but IDC sees 2012 as the start of a major shift. Android has a big lead in the number of devices sporting its popular OS – predicted to be a 61% share by year-end. Apple’s iOS takes second place with 20.5%, one-third the size of Google’s market. The upstart Microsoft Windows/Windows Mobile will probably end 2012 with a 5.2% share of the market, less than one-tenth the size of Android. By 2016, the IDC says the numbers will look significantly different.


    They predict that smartphone shipments will continue to grow through 2016, but this timeframe will see a big decline in Android OS use. It will probably peak in 2012 and then begin to lose significant market share to the Windows Phone platform. Apple’s iOS will probably see some decline as well.


    Enhance your mobility and turn your device into a power tool!  Discover select accessories such as; stylus & pens, micro SD memory cards, batteries, docking stations, Bluetooth headsets, data cables, HTC Media Link and XMI Speakers all specifically designed to make your devices functionally efficient and performance rich.


    Here are the IDC’s predictions. Between 2012 and 2016, Android’s share of the global market will decline more than 7% - from 61% to 52.9%. Apple’s iOS will become slightly less popular, going from 20.5% to 19%. Microsoft will be the big winner, with a quadrupling of its market share from 2012’s measly 5.2% to 19.2% in 2016. This obviously surpasses iOS as the No.2 smartphone platform in the world, not to mention ought to cause Google execs some sleepless nights.


    “Underpinning the smartphone market is the constantly shifting OS landscape,” IDC analyst Ramon Llamas said. “Android will maintain leadership throughout our forecast, while others will gain more mobile operator partnerships (Apple) or currently find themselves in the midst of a major transition (BlackBerry and Windows Phone/Windows Mobile). What remains to be seen is how these different operating systems – as well as others – will define and shape the user experience beyond what we see today in order to attract new customers and encourage replacements.”


    IDC expects RIM’s smartphone market share to stay relatively flat for the next few years. It will probably hold steady at around 6%. Other smartphone platforms can only expect a mere 3% of the market by 2016, down from 7.2% in 2012. Samsung’s Tizen platform makes up the majority of that 3%. Sorry Samsung. Maybe you should concentrate on Galaxy S IV and beyond.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    ASUS unveiled its ASUS Transformer AiO at this year’s Computex trade show in Taiwan. The Transformer AiO is a tablet with a touchscreen display that’s also an all-in-one computer. It’s a dual- boot device that runs both the Windows 8 OS and Google’s Android 4.0.


    ASUS Transformer AiO – a Windows 8 pc that’s also an enormous Android tablet


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    The “transforming” tablet sits in a dock and acts like a computer with a giant 18.4-inch display, a mouse and a keyboard. Pop the touchscreen out of the base, and you’ve got a tablet in your hand. But, it’s a tablet with a difference - it isn’t a standalone device like the others in its category. In tablet mode, it has to stay in range of the pc base.


    View this Asus Transformer AIO hands on video :



    Enhance your mobility and turn your tablet device into a power tool!  Discover select accessories such as; stylus & pens, micro SD memory cards, batteries, docking stations, Bluetooth headsets, data cables and XMI Speakers  all specifically designed to make your devices functionally efficient and performance rich.


    As innovative as Transformer AiO is, ASUS still has work to do on it. For instance, the display kicks over to Android as soon as it’s undocked. Even detached from the base, the display is supposed to function as a wireless screen for the pc. Switching away from the Windows OS shouldn’t happen automatically.


    ASUS has yet to announce all specifications for the Transformer AiO, but we do know that the docking base features multiple USB 3.0 ports, ethernet and an optical drive. The screen is LED backlit and supports up to 10-point multitouch.




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  • By Aldo Panessidi


    There’s no doubt that Ice Cream Sandwich users love the new Google OS, but that’s the opinion of only around 7% of total Android users. Gingerbread (Android 2.3) still dominates the market with a 65% share.


    Google’s Android 4.0 not showing much momentum


    Protect your Android devices with the latest innovative protection solutions... stylish top brand cases and skins specifically designed to protect your devices from scratches and blemishes.  Tough on the outside, sweet on the inside these brand name protection accessories combine complete device coverage with sleek artistic expression.  Discover a wide protection collection for:


    Samsung Galaxy S 3Galaxy S 2, Galaxy S2 X, Galaxy S 2 LTE, Galaxy Tab


    HTC One SHTC One X, HTC One V, HTC EVO 3D, HTC Flyer and HTC Jetstream


    Nokia Lumia 900 and Nokia Lumia 800


    Motorola Droid RAZR, Motorola Defy, Motoluxe, Motorola Xoom


    Sony Xperia U, Sony Xperia ION, Sony Xperia Play


    LG Optimus L7, LG Optimus 4G LTE and the Optimus Pad 


    Google had (and still has) great expectations for its Android 4.0 OS. Its rollout has been hampered by its availability on new devices, lack of upgrades to current devices and wireless carriers busy pointing fingers at who is responsible for the delays instead of getting their new devices tested and approved.


    As more carriers debut their new devices equipped with Android 4.0, the ICS numbers steadily improve (they were up 2% in the last month alone).




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