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Tag Archives: Apple accessories

Moshi for iPad
  • Our first 'Thank Gadget It's Friday' feature, Dexim's remote controlled Monster Truck for Apple devices

     


    We're making Fridays even more fun at the Pure Mobile blog, with a new weekly feature we're calling 'Thank Gadget It's Friday,' or TGIF for short.


    What better way to wrap up the week than with our favorite gadgets? And in this feature, we'll be bringing you our top picks in mobile accessories, from the coolest smartphone cases to the best phone docks and speakers.


    But we're kicking things off in style today, with an accessory that's a little out of the norm, and a whole lot of fun – Dexim's remote controlled AppSpeed Monster Truck.


    Definitely a toy for grown ups, the Dexim RC Truck uses Apple devices, like iPhone, iPad and iPod in lieu of a traditional controller. All you need is the free app that's provided when you purchase the truck.



    But that's not the only difference between this suped-up mobile accessory and a regular remote controlled car. Dexim's monster truck can be controlled by either traditional touch sensor or "gravity sensor," which lets you control the vehicle by tilting your device in different ways.


    The truck also has multiplayer mode for racing with friends, and comes with three preset stations that let you "automatically ZigZag, Spin, or Dance your vehicle to     music."


    As far as mobile accessories go, the Dexim RC Truck may not top the list of most needed, but it's certainly among the most exciting, and would certainly make a great gift for the techie in your life. Though we can think of more than a few people who'd simply want one for themselves.


    Vroom vroom!




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  • Beware: bogus iPhone 5 dock is total BS
    Posted on October 28, 2012 by ewilkinson

    Seeing is not believing: beware this bogus iPhone 5 dock

     


    At Pure Mobile, top-notch mobile accessories are kind of our thing.


    So when we came across a story on Gizmodo about a bogus Chinese iPhone 5 dock that doesn't actually work, all we could think was "for shame."


    "Don't buy an iPhone 5 dock," Gizmodo warned, "because it's a Chinese scam."


    Their information comes from Double Helix Cables, where a friend actually had a hands-on experience with the fake accessory. Here's what they had to say:


    "Opening up the box and out pops this stinker. I did a double take because it looked like a prank, prop, or placeholder of some sort. The lightning plug on the dock looks like a damn piece of cardboard, if you can even call it that. Because it's a cardboard-like chunk of circuit board that supposedly is going to fit into my iPhone 5."


    The reviewer goes on to write about the the fact that dock's cutout "isn't remotely close to being iPhone 5 shaped," and then elaborates on the "home brewed lightning plug [...] which 100% doesn't fit."


    A critic of the phoney dock took major issue with its "home brewed lightning plug"

     


    This lovely critique then ends with the writer concluding that any "further effort to make this non functional dock [work] would probably damage my iPhone."


    Granted, Apple doesn't actually make a dock accessory for the iPhone 5, yet. But that's no reason for third party manufacturers to start churning out ones that simply don't work.


    Many would be more than happy to produce a suitable iPhone 5 dock that actually functions, especially if they don't have to compete with Apple itself. There are plenty of fun third party iPhone 5 gadgets out there that not only work, but work really well.


    And, in our opinion, there's no excuse for this kind of blatant BS when so many companies have been able to turn a dollar making affordable and functional iPhone accessories that consumers actually want.




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  • The terms "Scratchgate" and "Scuffgate" have surfaced as early adopters of the iPhone 5 complain of unsightly marks on the aluminum back

     


    Okay, so it's not exactly a national scandal on the scale of Watergate, but there's a kerfuffle all across the web over the reputed inadequacy of the new iPhone 5's aluminum back.


    The fact that the aluminum is prone to scratching has users and tech sites shouting Scratchgate and Scuffgate, and even led to cries of "oh, the humanity!" Proud new owners of the iPhone 5 have already been complaining of unsightly scratches and scuffs on the black-coated aluminum of their new prized possession.


    And, as 9to5 Mac reported, one such user actually garnered a response from Apple's Senior VP of Marketing, Phil Schiller, who told him: “Any aluminum product may scratch or chip with use, exposing its natural silver color. That is normal.”


    Fair enough. The aluminum backing of the iPhone 5 may be prone to wear, but it is actually less fragile than the glass backing of the iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S. And even in a Gizmodo video where one user is determined to “scratch the hell” out of the new device within store, the iPhone 5 holds up pretty well, though it's never rubbed against sharp metal objects like keys or rings.



    Still, all of this brings us to an important, if awkward, discussion:


    It's fun to have the latest smartphone. You love Apple ever so much, and you and your new iPhone are planning to make a life together – at least until the next model comes out, that is.


    But the fact is, just because you trust your smartphone, there's no reason not to use protection. It's for your iPhone's good as much as your own. So glove the love.


    Yes, we're talking about cases and covers. In the case of the iPhone 4 and 4S, a rugged case is best (we've all seen those tragic shots of shattered glass.) But for the iPhone 5, a simple skin just to protect the black finish may be enough to do the trick.


    The result of unprotected smartphone love: the cracked glass panel of an iPhone 4

     


    Meanwhile, the moral of this story extends beyond Apple's products, to any smartphone you want to keep in good shape. To paraphrase Beyoncé, if you liked it then you should have put a skin on it.




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  • LifeProof's new Nüüd iPad case promises "barely there" waterproof protection

     


    Humankind's fascination with gadgets can only be rivalled by our longstanding fascination with water.


    So, even though we quake with fear at the thought of submerging our iPads, iPhones and other devices, it shouldn't really surprise us that, when people go swimming or surfing, they want to take their tablet or smartphone along.


    We've already seen something of the waterproofing trend from LifeProof – the San Diego-based company boasts what's been called the slimmest waterproof case for iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S.


     


    But now, the New York Times' Gadgetwise blog is reporting on the company's latest in elemental shielding for Apple devices.


    This time, LifeProof has taken its efforts to tablets, with the waterproof Nüüd iPad case. The product gets its name from the fact that there's actually no screen covering – your iPad's naked glass screen is already waterproof, and adding an extra film on top only reduces clarity.


    Instead, the Nüüd case seals around the glass and provides a waterproof backing for the rest of the iPad. There's also access at the bottom for charging and syncing, so you don't have to constantly take the case off and put it back on again.


    As Gadgetwise points out, you still may not want to do any serious snorkeling with your iPad, since it wasn't really designed for that. But the new iPad case is great for poolside, a day at the beach, or any other routine encounter with water.


    You may swear to have never texted on the toilet, but show me the techie who says they've never brought their phone or tablet into the bathroom, and I'll show you a liar. In any case, waterproofing just makes solid sense.


    Any survival expert will tell you that where there's life, there's water. But as we at Pure Mobile know, where there's life, there's also tech.





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  • A third party manufacturer compared the sizes of upcoming devices to an iPhone 4S case and an iPad 3 case

     


    We love a good rumor, and the big news on everyone's lips this week surrounded some leaked photos that may reveal the dimensions of the upcoming iPhone 5 and iPhone mini.


    MacRumors reported September 10th on pictures released by a third party iPhone and iPad case manufacturer that compare tentative cases for the new devices to an iPhone 4S case and iPad 3 case.


    “The cases were created by case manufacturers in anticipation of the upcoming models. Designs are based on leaked specs coming out of Foxconn factories,” says MacRumors.


    While the new iPhone 5 case is taller than the iPhone 4S, the case for the iPad mini is smaller than the current iPad 3 case

     


    If the specs are right, those who believe bigger is better will be happy to know that the new iPhone 5 will in fact be larger than the current iPhone 4S, though it'll just be taller, not wider, with a 4” diagonal screen.


    As for those who think less is more, the case designed for the new iPad Mini is smaller than the iPad 3 case shown in the image, but not significantly. The new device is rumored to have a 7.85” screen.


    The size comparison as outlined by MacRumors 

     


    As Gizmodo noted, “ if that iPad Mini shell is accurate, the realization that it's not a total dwarf next to the 10-inch iPad, kinda makes the idea of one all the more tantalizing.”


    For now, it's all just speculation, but we're likely to have at least part of the truth on September 12th, when Apple's expected to unveil the iPhone 5 at a press conference. However, we'll have to wait a little longer to see the new iPad Mini, which is expected to be unveiled at some point in October.




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  • Apple may have some revolutionary new earbuds for us to go along with next month’s iPhone launch.


    In a patent filed earlier this year, Apple described a “vented in-the-ear headphones” design that reduces the echo of your own voice that you sometimes hear when you're on the phone. The patent that got approved yesterday claims the invention “aims to improve the sound quality by venting or leakage.”


    It apparently works like this: When external vibrations caused from the sound within earphones bounce against the skull or other parts of the body near the ear, sound quality is reduced. Apple’s earbud design has a “vented tip” that forms a seal within the ear canal. As stated in Apple’s patent filing, “This provides the wearer with good acoustic isolation against external sounds.”


    This is good acoustic news for all of us who’ve tried carrying on a phone conversation while exercising or even walking on a noisy street. Now let’s hope Apple lets those new earbuds loose with that new iPhone.




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  •  



    The first time you picked up that Galaxy S III at the store, you fell in love with it. It had such a sleek, smooth feel, and so thin… Your service provider had it in that gorgeous pebble blue color. Sold!


    Then the clerk recommended hiding its beauty with a case or skin and a screen protector. Really?


    Sorry to say, you have to consider it. Here are a few reasons:


    Drops. Your phone will fall out of your pocket or slip out of your hand at some point. Given that you are probably hanging out on the concrete more than at home on the carpet, you know even the strongest case is going to get damaged. (And if that dent is in a spot where you hold the phone, you’ll get irritated again every time you make a call.) Besides, a cracked screen would really ruin your day.


    Germs. You’ve heard the horror stories. Most devices carry more germs than a toilet seat. That’s not just an ugly rumor. Study after study proves it. If you’re bothered by that, clean your phone regularly. If you’re the kind of person who likes that Spring cleaning feeling, wrap your phone in a skin and change it out if it really gets gooey or stained. A screen protector is even easier to swap out, so you can do those even more frequently.


    Look. A white Case is a beauty, but sometimes you need to show some personality. You want to show a little red once in a while, but not all the time. That red skin will look really good over that marble white case during the holiday season.


    Price. Even on contract, that S III set you back $200. Replacing it would hit you for at least $500. For that kind of money, you could buy a skin for every day of the month.


    Cases are designed to be smooth. That makes them slippery. That makes them more likely to be dropped. Hmmmm. Maybe that’s another reason that manufacturers make them that way…




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  • Who needs a professional camera with a telephoto lens when you have an Apple iPhone 4S? Photojournalist Dan Chung is showing the world just what Apple’s soon-to-be upstaged iPhone 4S can do by live blogging the pomp, circumstance and excitement of the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London using that amazing little camera phone.


    Chung is keeping a photoblog entirely made up of pictures taken with his iPhone, showing the action on the field, in the pools and in the stands. Using the camera in the iPhone 4S, a clip-on Schneider lens, some Canon binoculars and the Snapseed processing app, Chung is capturing everything that makes the Olympics such a special event.


    It looks like the iPhone 4S has found an unlikely home in the world of sports photography. We wonder what Chung would have been able to do with an iPhone 5. How about the Superbowl next year, Dan?




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  • The growing popularity of mobile media through PC Tablets, Android Smartphones and even Apple's iPhones is allowing new methodology and movements is changing on how consumers are engaging and interacting with the media. Gone are the days of the Sunday morning newspaper being read at the breakfast table with a steaming cup of coffee in one hand and the business section in the other, gone are the days of the family gathering around the television to watch the five o'clock news while mom prepares dinner in the nearby kitchen. Today the media is mobile and so are the individuals accessing that media on a weekly, daily or even hourly basis. Media consumers can simply stay connected by clicking on MSNBC.com or CNN.com while we sit in a drive thru waiting for our morning Starbucks coffee; we're literally connected with the media at our very fingertips. With the our fingertip connection many publishers, media companies and application developers are eager to know whether they should optimize their content for particular devices, advertisers want to understand how these devices might eventually fit into their overall marketing plans and even online newspaper carriers such as the USA Today or even the Wall Street Journal want to evolve their business models in a multi-connection world. No one in the mobile media universe wants to be left behind in this ever changing digital expansion.


    Smartphones and Connecting with the Consumer


    Overnight we have literally become a world “addicted to their Smartphones, iPhones and PC Tablets.” Whereas most common usage of those particular devices tends to include socializing, downloading music, gaming, and surfing the event, researchers have slowly and steadily began to see changes even in the ways consumers shop for their groceries. According to IGD Research Corporation, 1 in 10 online shoppers are using Smartphones to shop usually comparing prices, bargains and brands and more than 15% of customer checkouts during the first half of the year came via their Smartphone applications. More than 66% of surveyors indicated claimed that more than 75% of Smartphone users such as HTC One S, BlackBerry Bold 9900, etc used their Smartphones for personal reasons and 69% of users used it for business purposes. In the United States consumers prefer to mobile browsers for banking, travel, shopping, local info, news, video, sports and blogs and prefer applications for games, social media, maps and music.


    Smartphone usage is now a part of our daily lives whether at home or on the go and businesses without a Smartphone presence may find themselves competitively disadvantaged. Some mobile media and businesses changes to watch and take note of include 74.1% of mobile subscribers used text messaging on their mobile device, while 50.2% used downloaded applications. Smartphone and other mobile users cannot necessarily be defined by age, gender, income or race; instead they can be defined by their members' shared behaviors. It's up to businesses and mobile media to understand the common behavior traits that unite the class makes members easy to recognize and underscores the influence and utilize how their consumers are communicating, consuming media and deciphering consumer shopping and spending habits. Because the mobile media trend including Smartphones, iPhones and Tablets isn't going anywhere anytime soon but those that don't adapt will collapse as the mobile world around them continually presses forward.


    Smartphones and Connecting with the Consumer




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  • Samsung's Space Odyssey in court
    Posted on August 2, 2012 by kduggan


    Apple and Samsung are getting even pettier with their patent war, and the judge is getting fed up with it.


    Judge Lucy Koh took advantage of a day off from listening to the two in court to issue rulings that re-define the boundaries around Samsung’s arguments that they didn’t infringe on Apple’s iPad design or that Apple didn't have the rights to the design in the first place.


    Samsung appears to have crossed the line with their argument that Apple lifted it from the movie “2001: A Space Odyssey.” In a scene from the 1968 film, astronauts are eating and using personal tablet computers. Samsung argues that Apple got the idea for the iPad from that scene.


    According to Samsung, the tablet in the movie “has an overall rectangular shape with a dominant display screen, narrow borders, a predominately flat front surface, a flat back surface (which is evident because the tablets are lying flat on the table’s surface), and a thin form factor.” That describes an iPad alright.


    Samsung responded to Judge Koh’s statements with a press release that said, “Samsung was not allowed to tell the jury the full story and show the pre-iPhone design for that and other phones that were in development at Samsung in 2006, before the iPhone. The excluded evidence would have established beyond doubt that Samsung did not copy the iPhone design”.


    Apple and Samsung are back in court today. We’ll see whether they’re paying any attention to Judge Lucy, and are ready to get back to the point.




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